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424B4
IQIYI, INC. filed this Form 424B4 on 03/29/2018
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Table of Contents

TAXATION

The following summary of material Cayman Islands, PRC and U.S. federal income tax consequences of an investment in our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares is based upon laws and relevant interpretations thereof in effect as of the date of this prospectus, all of which are subject to change. This summary does not deal with all possible tax consequences relating to an investment in our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares, such as the tax consequences under state, local and other tax laws.

Cayman Islands Taxation

The Cayman Islands currently levies no taxes on individuals or corporations based upon profits, income, gains or appreciation and there is no taxation in the nature of inheritance tax or estate duty. There are no other taxes likely to be material to us or holders of our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares levied by the government of the Cayman Islands except for stamp duties which may be applicable on instruments executed in or, after execution, brought within the jurisdiction of the Cayman Islands. The Cayman Islands is not party to any double tax treaties that are applicable to any payments made by or to our company. There are no exchange control regulations or currency restrictions in the Cayman Islands.

People’s Republic of China Taxation

The Enterprise Income Tax Law provides that an enterprise established under the laws of a foreign country or region but whose “de facto management body” is located in the PRC is treated as a PRC resident enterprise for PRC tax purposes and consequently subject to the PRC income tax at the rate of 25% on its global income. The implementing rules of the Enterprise Income Tax Law merely define the location of the “de facto management body” as an “organizational body which effectively manages and controls the production and business operation, personnel, an accounting, properties and other aspects of operations of an enterprise.” Based on a review of surrounding facts and circumstances, we do not believe that we should be considered a PRC resident enterprise for PRC tax purposes. However, there is limited guidance and implementation history of the Enterprise Income Tax Law, and if we are treated as a PRC resident enterprise for PRC tax purposes, we will be subject to PRC tax on our global income at a uniform tax rate of 25%.

PRC income tax at the rate of 10% will apply to payments of dividends we make to investors that are “non-resident enterprises” of the PRC, if such investors do not have an establishment or place of business in the PRC, or if they have such establishment or place of business in the PRC but the relevant income is not effectively connected with such establishment or place of business, to the extent such dividends are deemed to be sourced within the PRC.

Furthermore, any gain realized on the transfer of our ADSs or Class A ordinary shares by such investors would also be subject to PRC income tax at 10% if such gain is regarded as income derived from sources within the PRC.

Furthermore, if we are considered a PRC resident enterprise and relevant PRC tax authorities consider the dividends we pay with respect to our shares or ADSs and the gains realized from the transfer of our shares or ADSs to be income derived from sources within the PRC, such dividends and gains earned by non-resident individuals would be subject to the 20% PRC individual income tax.

These rates could be reduced by applicable tax treaties or similar arrangements between China and the jurisdiction of the investor. For example, for investors in Hong Kong, the tax rate is reduced to 7% for interest payments and 5% for dividends. However, it is unclear whether non-PRC shareholders would be able to claim the benefits of any tax treaties between their country of tax residence and the PRC in the event that we are treated as a PRC resident enterprise.

 

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