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424B4
IQIYI, INC. filed this Form 424B4 on 03/29/2018
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Sale or Other Disposition of the ADSs or Ordinary Shares

Subject to the passive foreign investment company rules discussed below, you will recognize gain or loss on any sale, exchange or other taxable disposition of an ADS or ordinary share equal to the difference between the amount realized for the ADS or ordinary share and your tax basis in the ADS or ordinary share. The gain or loss will generally be capital gain or loss. If you are an individual or other non-corporate U.S. Holder who has held the ADS or ordinary share for more than one year, you will generally be eligible for reduced tax rates. The deductibility of capital losses is subject to limitations. Any such gain or loss that you recognize will generally be treated as U.S. source income or loss for foreign tax credit limitation purposes, which will generally limit the availability of foreign tax credits. However, in the event we are deemed to be a PRC “resident enterprise” under PRC tax law, we may be eligible for the benefits of the treaty. In such event, if PRC tax were to be imposed on any gain from the disposition of the ADSs or ordinary shares, a U.S. Holder that is eligible for the benefits of the treaty may elect to treat such gain as PRC source income. U.S. Holders should consult their tax advisors regarding the creditability of any PRC tax.

Passive Foreign Investment Company Considerations

A non-U.S. corporation, such as our company, is considered a passive foreign investment company, or PFIC, for any taxable year if either (i) at least 75% of its gross income is passive income, or (ii) at least 50% of the value of its assets (based on an average of the quarterly values of the assets during a taxable year) is attributable to assets that produce or are held for the production of passive income, or asset test. We will be treated as owning our proportionate share of the assets and earning our proportionate share of the income of any other corporation in which we own, directly or indirectly, more than 25% (by value) of the shares. Although the law in this regard is not entirely clear, we treat our consolidated affiliated entities as being owned by us for U.S. federal income tax purposes because we exercise effective control over them and we are entitled to substantially all of their economic benefits and, as a result, we consolidate their results of operations in our combined and consolidated financial statement. If it were determined, however, that we are not the owner of our consolidated affiliated entities for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we would likely be treated as a PFIC for our taxable year ended December 31, 2018 and for subsequent taxable years.

Assuming we are the owner of our consolidated affiliated entities in the PRC for U.S. federal income tax purposes, based on our current and expected income and assets and projections of the value of our ADSs following this offering, we do not presently expect to be a PFIC for the current taxable year or the foreseeable future. However, given the lack of authority and the highly factual nature of the analysis, no assurance can be given. The determination as to whether we are a PFIC must be made annually after the end of each taxable year, and consequently, our PFIC status may change. While we do not anticipate becoming a PFIC, changes in the nature of our income or assets or the value of our ADSs and ordinary shares may cause us to become a PFIC for the current or any subsequent taxable year. In particular, because the total value of our assets for purposes of the asset test may be calculated using the market price of the ADSs, our PFIC status may depend in large part on the market price of the ADSs, which may fluctuate considerably. The composition of our income and assets may also be affected by how, and how quickly, we use our liquid assets and the cash raised in this offering. In addition, because there are uncertainties in the application of the relevant rules, it is possible that the IRS may challenge our classification of certain income and assets as non-passive or our valuation of our tangible and intangible assets, each of which may result in our becoming a PFIC for the current or subsequent taxable years. If we are a PFIC for any year during which you hold the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares, we will generally continue to be treated as a PFIC for all succeeding years during which you hold such ADSs or Class A ordinary shares. However, if we cease to be a PFIC, provided that you have not made a mark-to-market election, as described below, you may avoid some of the adverse effects of the PFIC regime by making a deemed sale election with respect to the ADSs or Class A ordinary shares, as applicable.

If we are a PFIC for any taxable year during which you hold ADSs or Class A ordinary shares, you will be subject to special tax rules with respect to any “excess distribution” that you receive and any gain you realize

 

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